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Emily Eliza Scott

Jul 8 – 19, 2019
Summer Intensive 2019
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Image of artist Emily Eliza Scott
Emily Eliza Scott. Courtesy the artist.
Image of BP oil spill in realtime
Spill cam from BP. Image courtesy of Emily Scott.

In this seminar, focused on everyday climate change(s), we will put field-based observation and other site-specific skills to work in order to probe various ways that this highly dynamic and multi-faceted process-force is embedded within the seemingly mundane.

We will turn our attention, especially, to the uneven effects of climate breakdown and perspectives often sidelined or excluded from mainstream coverage. More broadly, we will explore the entangled human-natural ecologies comprising Miami and its reaches—i.e., both within the city and so-called “nature”—including transformations already underway as a result of climate change (and which often take place in plain daylight but under the radar). Climate change is taken here to be an expansive and interdependent subject, at once visible and invisible, fast and slow, concrete and imagined, social and environmental.

Schedule
  • Sensing Everyday Climate Change(s)

    Mon, Jul 15, 2019
    10:00 am to 12:30 pm
  • Tue, Jul 16, 2019
    10:00 am to 12:30 pm
  • Wed, Jul 17, 2019
    10:00 am to 12:30 pm
  • Thu, Jul 18, 2019
    10:00 am to 12:30 pm
About Emily Eliza Scott

Emily Eliza Scott is an interdisciplinary scholar, artist, and former park ranger focused on contemporary art and design practices that engage pressing (political) ecological issues, often with the intent to actively transform real-world conditions. Currently a joint professor in the History of Art and Architecture & Environmental Studies at the University of Oregon, she was formerly a postdoc at the Inst. for the History and Theory of Architecture at ETH Zurich and holds a PhD in contemporary (post-1945) art history from UCLA. Her writings have appeared in Art Journal, Art Journal Open, American Art, Third Text, The Avery Review, Field, and Cultural Geographies as well as multiple edited volumes and online journals; her first book, Critical Landscapes: Art, Space, Politics, coedited with Kirsten Swenson, was published by the University of California Press in 2015. At present, she is developing a monograph on contemporary art and geological imaginaries; a coedited volume on art, visual culture, and climate change; and new courses on land art, Anthropocene debates, and “unnatural disasters.” She is also a core participant in two long-term, collaborative art projects: the Los Angeles Urban Rangers (2004-) and World of Matter (2011-). Her work has been supported by major grants/awards from Creative Capital, the College Art Association, Graham Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, Luce Foundation, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Annenberg Foundation, and Switzer Foundation.

Reading List
Semester
Jul 8 – 19, 2019
Summer Intensive 2019
Learn More